Search for products & expert beauty tips at our affiliate site www.organicbeautybrands.com #OBB

Safe Cosmetics Australia

The Toxic-Free Campaign

Key Issues | Chemicals that form The Toxic-Free Campaign

Why should Australian's be concerned? Thousands of chemicals are available for use in cosmetics and everyday household products. Many of these chemicals have adverse health effects and are banned or restricted in other countries. Current law concerning the use of chemicals in Australia, does not protect you or the environment from the use of potentially harmful chemicals permitted in everyday products. 
SCA endorses brands that choose to adopt a healthier ingredient philosophy, their products are formulated without unnecessary chemicals. Choosing products that contain very few ingredients is the healthier choice when it comes to avoiding adverse reactions to chemicals commonly found in cosmetics, skincare, personal care, baby care, perfume, pet care and household products. As is choosing Brands That Care
How can you get involved? Sign and share the campaign Petition, download the Toxic-Free Guides, explore SCA's affiliate site OBB to search for products and learn more about chemicals, cosmetics, your health and beauty. Be proactive and always read the product label, this is your best defence against harmful chemicals like synthetic fragrances and coal tar dyes, plasticisers,FRP's and irritating preservatives. 
Get the latest updates by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.

See below for the The Toxic-Free Campaign criteria or view Key Allergens

Chemicals & Your Body

Your skin is the largest organ of the body, it is responsible for detoxification and absorption. Scientific studies carried out by the American Journal Of Public Health, found that;
  • the skin absorbs up to 64% of what is applied topically;
  • other studies found the face to be even more permeable than broad body surfaces with a 100% absorption rate concerning the underarms and genitalia areas;
  • whilst another peer-reviewed study showed a 100% absorption for fragrance ingredients that contain thousands of toxic chemicals commonly found in almost every beauty product.

What you put on your body will absorb into your skin and enter the body, these toxic chemicals can disrupt your endocrine system, cause hormonal imbalance and worse. The solution? Minimise your exposure by choosing products that exclude potentially toxic-chemicals.

Skin-flora V's Chemicals

Until now, the rapid growth of skin allergies and ill-health in the West has remained largely unexplained. Results of this study published December 2018, gives the first indications of a link between SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS IN COSMETICS and its effects on skin-microbiome biodiversity.


Science can now prove direct links between a decrease in your skin's microbial diversity from exposure to synthetic chemicals in cosmetics, and that poor skin health impacts your general health.


Microorganisims play an important role in skin diseases such as acne, dermatitis, psoriasis and rosacea. Do the products we use affect our skin's health? Should we consider our skin's bacteria when choosing skincare products? READ MORE >>

Campaign Vision

Safe Cosmetics Australia campaigns for a toxic-free future. It’s about finding a compromise between manufacturers, consumer demand, chemicals and the way cosmetics are made in Australia. By simplifying a complicated issue, applying common sense backed up by scientific research and refining the infinite list of toxic chemicals used in cosmetics and everyday household products, the campaign addresses the key chemicals of concern. Safe Cosmetics Australia campaigns to raise chemical awareness, with an estimated 80,000 chemicals available world wide, 40,000 of those chemicals permitted for use in Australia and over 10,000 specifically for use in the beauty industry. 

Below you will find a list of chemicals that are internationally recognised as being toxic to human health. These chemicals form the "Key Issues" of The Toxic-Free Campaign, some of these chemicals are banned and/or restricted overseas, but permitted for use in Australian cosmetics and toiletries without restriction. These chemicals are found in every day household products including baby products, hair care, oral care, toothpaste, skincare and cleaning products alike and much more. This raises alarming health concerns for all Australian’s, your help is needed to change the way we use chemicals - consumers have the power to make positive changes for a healthier future. 

The Toxic-Free Campaign aims to raise chemical awareness. Realising that we can achieve a pre-market regulatory system in the near future that benefits all Australians. By opening up and being more receptive to consumers, by being more inviting and making it easier for people to understand the campaign. SCA campaigns to make it easier for people to understand chemicals, to be informed about harmful and positive manufacturing processes and to further understand basic labeling laws that do not necessarily protect your health or the environment.

The potential impacts that toxic chemicals have on human health, animals and the environment is a global issue. To help us all work towards a more sustainable future, SCA has launched an affiliate site Organic Beauty Brands, Est.2017, where members can publish articles, share their story and connect with others that seek truth and honesty when it comes to manufacturing principles and the global use of chemicals. By choosing brands that are independently certified, recommended by professionals or have won an award, you can find top rated products that go above and beyond current legislation to protect your health by delivering quality effetive products that you can trust.

Cosmetic Labelling Law

Cosmetic compliance and safety and the Australian Consumer Law

"Compliance with the cosmetic standard is important for the ACCC as a product safety regulator and consumer watchdog. Cosmetic suppliers are legally responsible for ensuring products meet the requirements of the cosmetics labelling standard, which is enforced under the Australian Consumer Law (ACL)" - ACCC. "The first port of call is compliance with the mandatory standard for cosmetic ingredient labelling. I trust that you are all aware of the standard and know where to find it. If not, go to the Product Safety Australia website (www.productsafety.gov.au). Here you will find information and a link to the government’s ComLaw website, where you can download a free copy." - ACCC

The Toxic-Free Campaign

Safe Cosmetics Australia SCA, is a not-for-profit organisation based in Sydney, Australia. Established 2010, by founder Amina Kitching. SCA's mission is to raise chemical awareness and advocate for pre-market regulations. SCA is the official self-regulatory representative body of The Toxic Free Campaign, and the licensor of Australian Certified Toxic-Free® Made Safe® and Allergy Certified® Registered Australian Trademarks, licensed by brands that share a passion for ingredient transparency, consumer health and beauty. SCA is celebrating it's tenth year of campaigning, over 100+ brands and 1,800+ products reviewed and recommended. "One of the most important factors concerning the campaign, is being able to honor our audience, listen and respond to them. By sharing recommended products and articles with consumers, manufacturers and industry professionals, together we can all campaign for a healthier future. Your help is needed, you can make a difference! Consumers are the most powerful people on the planet and the choices you make shape the future of our global community" Amina Kitching, Founder SCA & OBB.
"Safe Cosmetics Australia, The Toxic-Free Campaign, is calling for make-up giants
to reformulate their products and make ingredient labeling clearer."

Top Offenders

Current legislation allows potentially toxic chemicals to be used in everyday household items like tooth paste, soap, face wash, shampoo and conditioner, skin care creams, hair care products, baby care products, sunscreen and much more - even when science has proven direct links to adverse health effects. Using international resources, Amina Kitching, founder of Safe Cosmetics Australia, has compiled the following list of unnecessary ingredients that are of the highest concern to your health and safety; "These so called 'top offenders' are common chemicals that are widely used in everyday household products, they pose a potential risk to human health. Below you will find each chemical with links to reputable resources including global campaigns, Government agencies, peer reviewed studies, and advocates and academics, that highlight the need to raise consumer awareness."

- Criteria For Products endorsed by SCA -

Australian Certified Toxic-Free (logo) criteria: Each chemical has specific usage guidelines that excludes and/or restricts their use (outlined below). Where a given product excludes and/or restricts the chemicals (outlined below), SCA will endorse the product with the Toxic-Free Tick (logo).

Made Safe (logo): Each chemical has specific usage guidelines that excludes and/or restricts their use (outlined below). Where a given product contains more than the specified percentage, and less than 15% combined total usage of the following chemicals (outlined below), the product can be endorsed with SCA's Made Safe® (logo). Where a given product contains more than 15% combined total usage of the following chemicals (outlined below), the product will not be endorsed by Safe Cosmetics Australia, The Toxic-Free Campaign.
Other campaigns include: Allergy Certified Campaign
 

Manufacturer's of cosmetics, personal care and cleaning products should always refer to TGA's Poison Standard (SUSMP):- both natural and synthetic chemicals may have restrictions as well as product labelling requirements. This site is for educational purposes only and should not be a substitute for advice or treatment from qualified medical professionals. All information on this website remains the intellectual property of their respective owners (Every quote is published with a link to the authors website). Excluding intellectual property owned by others, all site content is copyrighted or licensed for use by the owner of this website. All Rights Reserved. For more information see Terms & Conditions.

 

Plasticisers in Cosmetics

NICNAS is required to publish a "List of priority existing chemicals" once a year, many of the chemicals have not been assessed for 7 to 15 years. Periodical assessment is lacking, several chemicals state that they have been assessed without providing any record of such assessment. You can visit the NICNAS website and search for each chemical by the CAS NO. provided below. This list of potentially toxic chemicals includes commonly used chemicals that consumers of all ages may be exposed to on a day-to-day basis, from nail polish to baby bath wash, family shampoo and toothpaste, floor cleaner, fragrances and beyond. The list of harmful chemicals published below aims to raise awareness concerning some of the big offenders, it is by no means a complete list as over 10,000 chemicals are reported to be used in cosmetics, skincare, pet care and home cleaning agents.

 

Acrylamide

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain acrylamide and it's derivatives.
CAS No: 79-06-1
Acrylic Amide; and "Synonym(s): 2PROPENAMIDE; 2-PROPENAMIDE; 2-PROPENAMIDE (9CI) ; ACRYLAMIDE (ACGIH:OSHA) ; ACRYLAMIDE MONOMER; ACRYLIC AMIDE; AKRYLAMID (CZECH) ; AMID KYSELINY AKRYLOVE (CZECH) ; ETHYLENECARBOXAMIDE; PROPENAMIDE; PROPENOIC ACID AMIDE" EWG
HOW IS IT USED:

In cosmetics acylamide is reported to be used in cosmetics at 0.05% to 2.8% (journals.sagepub.com). Acrylamide is a known neurotoxin that is used as a binder, film former and as a viscosity increasing agent including in eyelash adhesives, artificial nail builder and binders, as a film former and suspending agent in creams and other emulsions, in hair spray as a fixative and as an anti-static agent in aerosols.

RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
WHAT ARE ACRYLATES?

  • Acrylates are a family of polymers, a type of vinyl polymer. Acrylamide is considered a neurotoxin and skin irritant; formed during high temperature cooking such as frying, roasting and baking; used in making plastics, paper, dyes, contact lenses; widely used in industrial processes, plastics, water treatment, drinking water and treating wastewater, aids, thickeners, soil conditioning agents, sewage. Known to cause adverse skin, eye, throat reactions; is a probable human carcinogen. For an overview see: ScienceDirect.com

  • Environmental disaster; plastics are persistent pollutants damaging the ocean and marine life. Plastics take thousands of years to break down.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Polyacrylamide

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain polyacrylamide and it's derivatives.
CAS No: 28501-56-6
Other names: Acrylamide, methacrylamide copolymer; and "Polyacrylamide is a synthetic polymer of acrylamide; and Synonym(s): 2-PROPENAMIDE, HOMOPOLYMER; 2PROPENAMIDE, HOMOPOLYMER; ACRYLAMIDE HOMOPOLYMER; HOMOPOLYMER 2-PROPENAMIDE; POLYACRYLAMIDE; POLYACRYLAMIDE; 2-PROPENAMIDE, HOMOPOLYMER; PAA" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED:

Polyacrylamide is derived from acrylamide; it is used in the formulation of many cosmetic products to help stablise and bind  products like foundation, eye shadow, blush, eyeliner, skin cleansers, moisturisers, lotions, creams, self-tanning products, hair care and nail care products. It is also used to treat water. Polyacrylamide is considered safe to use with less than 0.01% acrylamide monomer.

RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS POLYACRYLAMIDE?

  • A known neurotoxin. "Children are vulnerable to the detrimental health effects of polyacrylamides. For one, acrylamides have been detected in breast milk and can cross the placenta. For another, neurodevelopmental deficiencies have been observed in the infants of animals exposed to acrylamides." - Chemicals.News

  • Polyacrylamide is considered non-toxic, however, it has the potential to excrete acrylamide, a toxic chemical. It is used in paper making, screen printing, as a soil conditioner and a as dermal filler in cosmetic surgery.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Triphenyl Phosphate TPP, TPHP, DPHP

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain TPP and it's derivatives.

CAS No: 603-35-0

TRIPHENYL PHOSPHATE; TPP and "Synonym(s): "PHOSPHORIC ACID, TRIPHENYL ESTER; TRIPHENYL ESTER PHOSPHORIC ACID; CELLUFLEX TPP; DISFLAMOLL TP; PHOSFLEX TPP; REOLUBE TPP; REOMOL TPP; TPP; TRIFENYLFOSFAT (CZECH) ; TRIPHENYL PHOSPHATE (ACGIH:OSHA)" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED:
Reported usage up to 1.6% TPP - Plasticiser used in nail polish and nail enamels, base coats and undercoats, and manicuring products.  NICNAS reported commercial use in construction materials. Known skin sensitiser; "used in 372 leave-on manicuring preparations, with the majority of the uses being reported in nail polishes and enamels." - CIRSafety.org
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS TRIPHENYL PHOSPHATE?

  • "The chemical has reported domestic and commercial use in paints, lacquers and varnishes." - NICNAS and, "Skin Irritation; The chemical is reported to slightly irritate the skin in animal studies. The irritation effects were not sufficient to warrant hazard classification." And, "Skin Sensitisation The chemical is considered to be a skin sensitiser based on positive results seen in a single guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT)"

  • "It is used as fire-retarding agent, and a plasticizer for cellulose acetate and nitrocellulose. Triphenyl phosphate also has been found as one component of lubricating oil and hydraulic fluids. HUMAN STUDIES: It causes a delayed peripheral neuritis involving motor neurons, resulting in a flaccid paralysis, particularly of the distal muscles." - ToxNet, And, "TPP caused generalized delayed illness and paralysis in cats and primates." And, "A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported." And, "results indicate that nail polish may be a significant source of short-term TPHP exposure and a source of chronic exposure for frequent users or those occupationally exposed." - ToxNet Peer Reviewed

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Colours, Bleaching & Hair Dyes

(Also see Skin, Eye & Lung Irritants below)

Coal Tar Dyes

SCA endorses products with the Allergy Certified logo, that restrict the use of synthetic colours to a maximum of 1% or less for leave on-products and a maximum of 2.5% or less for wash-off products. Colour additives should also require a warning on the product label to "always patch test before use" and "discontinue use if irritation occurs".


Where a brand tests their products and/or the ingredient of concern is tested for carcinogenic contaminants, test reports confirming that the product and/or ingredients are free-from carcinogens can be submitted; SCA will endorse the product(s) containing toxic-free coal tar dyes.
"FD&C and D&C DYES; COLOUR INDEX NUMBERS; 42090, 61570, 61565, 59040, 15510, 45370:1, 14700, 26100, 45380:2, 48380, 45410:1, 45410, 17200, 16035, 60730, 19140, 15985, 47005, 47000. *Important note; FD&C Red 3 and FD&C Blue 2 are not permitted in cosmetics. FD&C and D&C ALUMINUM LAKES; COLOUR INDEX NUMBERS; 15850:2, 15850:1, 45410:2, 45410:2, 73360:1, 17200, 16035, 42090, 60730, 19140, 47005:1. *Important note; FD&C Blue 2 lakes are not approved for cosmetic use." - IFC SOLUTIONS
HOW IS IT USED?
RESEARCH -WHAT EXPERTS SAY
  •  The European Classification considers coal tar dyes to be a human carcinogen and they are banned by the European Union.
  • The Dirty Dozen
WHAT ARE COAL TAR DYES?

  • Synthetic colours. FD&C or D&C artificial colours are derived from coal tar or petroleum. Synthetic colors are suspected to be a human carcinogen, a skin irritant and are linked to ADHD in children. Dyes are not pure chemicals and may contain upwards of 10% impurities.

  • Many artificial food colours are derivatives of petrochemicals and coal tar. Coloring agents blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5, and yellow 6 are banned in the EU. Dyes are manufactured as powders, granules or liquids. They are used as a colouring agent in food, cosmetics and other household products.

  • Studies show that long-term exposure to artificial dyes can cause cancer or other effects.
  • EWG "Other HIGH concerns: Contamination concerns, Organ system toxicity (non-reproductive), Persistence and bio-accumulation"

RESROUCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Peroxide

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain peroxide or ammonia (see below).
BENZYL CAS No: 94-36-0
ACTEYL CAS No: 110-22-5
LAUROYL CAS No: 105-74-8
HYDROGEN CAS No: 7722-84-1

BLEACHING AGENT; Benzoyl Peroxide; "Synonym(s): DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE; PEROXIDE, DIBENZOYL; ACNEGEL; AZTEC BPO; BENZOPEROXIDE; BENZOYL PEROXIDE (ACGIH:OSHA) ; BENZOYL SUPEROXIDE; BENZOYLPEROXID (GERMAN) ; BENZOYLPEROXYDE (DUTCH) ; BZF-60; CADAT BPO" - EWG

HOW IS IT USED?
According to MyHairdressers.com: "Permanent hair colour is mixed with 10 vol (3%), 20 vol (6%), 30 vol (9%) or 40 vol (12%) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), known as an oxidant. The choice of oxidant is key for achieving the correct target shade and depth. The average tube of permanent colour is made up of 10% alkali, 20% H202 and 70% colour molecules." Chemical bleaching agents that are used to remove colour and whiten products. In cosmetics it is often used in medical products to acne treat blemishes. Commonly found in hair colours to lighten hair including hair dye, lash tint, brow tint and shampoo. "Inhalation of household strength hydrogen peroxide (3%) can cause respiratory irritation." - ATSDR
RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS PEROXIDE?

  • A known skin sensitiser, irritating to the skin, eyes and lungs. In cosmetics, it is believed that this compound works by destroying the bacteria associated with acne. It works by continuous daily treatment, but when you stop using it the acne comes back.

  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) "says products containing the ingredients benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid can cause rare but serious and potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or severe irritation."


  • Human exposure studies "a reaction occurred in 70% of subjects after use of occlusive patches containing a 5% or 10% concentration." - TOXNET

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Ethanolamine MEA

SCA does not endorse products with the Toxi-Free Tick, that contain MEA.
CAS No: 119337-98-3
Monoethanolamine or MEA; "Synonym(s): 2-AMINO- ETHANOL; 2-AMINOETHANOL; 2-HYDROXYETHYLAMINE; ETHANOL, 2-AMINO-; ETHANOL, 2AMINO; MEA; MONOETHANOLAMINE; 2-AMINOAETHANOL (GERMAN) ; 2-AMINOETANOLO (ITALIAN) ; 2-AMINOETHANOL (OSHA) ; 2-HYDROXYETHYLAMINE." - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

According to USA Exposure Limit by NIOSH; MEA is used in the production of cosmetics at 0.0003% up to 0.0006% with 0.003% likely to cause inhalation danger in animal studies 1994; Found in personal care products, household products, detergents, emulsifiers, polishes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitors, chemical intermediates.

RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS MEA?


  • Restricted in the US, the CIR expert review panel concluded that ethanolamines were "safe for use in cosmetics and personal care products designed for discontinuous, brief use followed by thorough rinsing from the surface of the skin. In products intended for more prolonged contact with the skin, the concentration of TEA and DEA should not exceed 5% percent, while ethanolamine should be used only in rinse-off products."Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics "Human immune and respiratory toxicant or allergen - strong evidence air borne products"

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 
 

Hair dye HC Red No.10 & No.11

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick that do not contain HC Red number 10 & number 11 and/or that contain 2% or less of these dyes in combination of all products applied to the hair simultaneously.

In addition, the product label must provide a safety warning as per TGA Poisons Standard states recommendation: "repeated exposure may cause sensitisation" the safety warning is to be supplied on the brands website.

CAS No: 95576-89-9 & 95576-92-4

1,2-Propanediol, 3-[(4-amino-2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)amino]-
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • "Restricted in the European Union (EU) under the EU Cosmetics Regulation 1223/2009 Annex III—'List of substances which cosmetic products must not contain except subject to the  restrictions laid down'. The maximum concentrations allowed to be applied to hair in non-oxidative and oxidative hair dyes are 2 % and 1 %, respectively (CosIng). The use concentration of these chemicals in hair dyes in Australia is not available to NICNAS. Currently, there are no concentration restrictions in Australia for using these chemicals in hair dyes. Neither chemical, HC Red No. 10 or HC Red No. 11, is listed on the Hazardous Chemical Information System (HCIS) (Safe Work Australia). This Tier III assessment was conducted to determine if risk management recommendations for public health are required for safe use of these chemicals in hair dyes." NICNAS
WHAT IS IT & HOW IS IT USED?
  • Red synthetic hair dye; commonly used by women to colour the hair a vibrant rich red colour. "In an in vivo percutaneous study (non-guideline)." And, "Results showed a total absorption." And, "Excretion was reported to be 60 % of the absorbed dose in the urine and 40 % in the faeces (SCCS, 2011)." - NICNAS

  • "The available data are limited on relevant critical health end points such as skin sensitisation and carcinogenicity." And, "The chemicals can cause harmful effects following a single oral exposure." - NICNAS

HC Red 13 (INCI):
  • TGA Poisons Standard states "The risk could be controlled by including warning statements on labels for hair dye formulations containing the chemicals at any concentration." TGA suggests that hair dye labels state, "repeated exposure may cause sensitisation".
  • EU Cosmetics Regulation 344/2013 states: usage is acceptable at a maximum concentration of 2.5 % (as hydrochloride salt).
 

Controversial Preservatives

Triclosan

In accordance with Australia's Poison Standard; SCA does not endorse products with the Toxic-Free Tick logo, that contain more than 0.3% Triclosan; products containing 0.3% or less for adult use only, are endorsed by SCA with the Toxic-Free Tick logo.
CAS No: 3380-34-5
Triclosan; "Synonym(s): 2,4,4'-TRICHLORO-2'-HYDROXY DIPHENYL ETHER; 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) - PHENOL; 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) PHENOL; PHENOL, 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) -; PHENOL, 5CHLORO2 (2,4DICHLOROPHENOXY) ; 2,4,4'-TRICHLORO-2'-HYDROXYDIPHENYL ETHER; 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY) PHENOL; CH 3565; IRGASAN; IRGASAN DP300; PHENOL, 5-CHLORO-2- (2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXY)"EWG

HOW IS IT USED?


Triclosan (Phenol, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)- is an antibacterial agent preservative and deodorant agent. It is used in personal care and home cleaning products.

RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • TGA Poisons Standard for products containing more than 0.3% requires product safety warnings, Schedule 6:

    Poison (SUSMP) States "Substances with a moderate potential for causing harm, the extent of which can be reduced through the use of distinctive packaging with strong warnings and safety directions on the label."

  • Big name brands plan to phase out triclosan that linked to hormone disruption.
  • NICNAS notification obligations may apply to importantion; list of priority existing chemicals last update; January 2009
  • Restricted in cosmetics in the European Union, Canada, Japan and Australia to 0.3%; classified as expected to be toxic or harmful by Environment Canada Domestic Substances.
WHAT IS TRICLOSAN?

  • Known endocrine disruptor and skin irritant; especially thyroid and reproductive hormones. Studies raise concerns that triclosan contributes to making bacteria antibiotic-resistant. Tricolson can be found in toothpastes, antibacterial soaps and deodorants. Commonly used in baby care products including body wash, toothpaste and shampoo. SafeWork Australia's HSIS states "Toxic by inhalation (R23)"; "Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin (R36/37/38)"; "Very toxic to aquatic organisms (R50)"; and "May cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment (R53)".

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Bronopol

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain bronopol.

 CAS No: 52-51-7

"Synonym(s): 2-BROMO-2-NITROPROPANE-1,3-DIOL, 1,3-PROPANEDIOL, 2-BROMO-2-NITRO-; 1,3PROPANEDIOL, 2BROMO2NITRO; 2-BROMO-2-NITRO- 1,3-PROPANEDIOL; BRONOPOL; 2-BROMO-2-NITRO-1,3-PROPANEDIOL; 2-BROMO-2-NITROPROPAN-1,3-DIOL; 2-BRONOPOL; BETA-BROMO-BETA-NITROTRIMETHYLENEGLYCOL; BRONIDIOL; BRONOCOT; BRONOPOL" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?
Commonly used in colour cosmetics, liquid hair and baby care products, hand sanitisers, cosmetics, bleaching agents, adhesives, odour agents, topical medical creams, paint and carpets, nail products and all kinds of household cleaning agents.
RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
  • Bronopol is a known formaldehyde releaser in cosmetics, PSIC.
  • NICNAS not restricted for use. Tier I assessment indicated that it needed further investigation. Tier II assessment November 2014.
  • EU Cosmetic Directive 76/768/EEC Annex VI Part 1, List of preservatives allowed (at up to 0.1%);
  • New Zealand Cosmetic Products Group Standard—Schedule 7: Preservatives cosmetic products may contain with restrictions;
  • Health Canada List of prohibited and restricted cosmetic ingredients (The Cosmetic Ingredient ‘Hotlist’)—Permitted at concentrations equal to or less than 0.1%. Not permitted in formulations that contain amines or amides; and
  • US Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Cosmetic ingredients found safe, with qualifications—should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds can be formed.
WHAT IS BRONOPOL?


  • People are exposed to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing preservatives (FRP's) every day. For many people, over exposure to this group of chemicals can lead to a formaldehyde allergy.

  • Continued exposure to FRP's can cause severe allergic reactions of the skin and eyes, as well as skin allergies and rashes. Bronopol irritates the eyes, the skin and the respiratory tract. "Inhalation: Cough. Sore throat. Skin; Redness. Eyes; Redness. Stinging sensation. Pain. Burns." - ICPS INCHEM

  • "In the USA, approximately 20% of cosmetics and personal care products (stay-on products: 17%, rinse-off products 27%) contain a formaldehyde-releaser." - ATSDR.
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

BHA & BHT

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain BHA and/or BHT.
CAS No: 25013-16-5 & CAS No: 128-37-0

BUTYLATED HYDROXYANISOLE; and "Synonym(s): ANTIOXYNE B; ANTRANCINE 12; EEC NO. E320; EMBANOX; NIPANTIOX 1-F; PROTEX; SUSTANE 1-F; TENOX BHA" - EWG


BHT; BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENE; and "Synonym(s): DBPC; ADVASTAB 401; AGIDOL; AGIDOL 1; ALKOFEN BP; ANTIOXIDANT 29; ANTIOXIDANT 30; ANTIOXIDANT 4; ANTIOXIDANT 4K; ANTIOXIDANT KB; ANTRANCINE 8 "- EWG

HOW IS IT USED?
ScienceDirect.com says that the percentage useage is commonly 0.005% and, that
"Immunologic Butylated hydroxytoluene in chewing gum should be considered as a possible cause of unexplained food allergy."

Synthetically manufactured preservatives: Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and the related compound butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are often added to cosmetics and medicines as preservatives. Also processed foods like cereals, gum, fast food, snacks, processed potatoes, drinks, shortening etc.
RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
  • BHA is listed as a carcinogen under California's Prop 65.
  • NICNAS not restricted for use. Tier II ssessment October 2017.
  • The Dirty Dozen
WHAT IS BHA & BHT?

  • The National Toxicology Program classifies BHA as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen". In Europe BHA is an approved food additive, considered "possible carcinogenic". The FDA says BHA is generally safe. 


  • In animal studies, BHA has been shown to produce liver damage and stomach cancers, and interfere with normal functions of the reproductive system and thyroid hormones.

  • BHA can be found in food, food packaging and personal care products. "In vitro estimations of the percentage hemolysis (50% hemolysis indicating a 50% toxicity level). showed that BHT is more toxic than BHA . This clearly indicates that at the concentrations of 0.75%, BHA and BHT are harmful to the blood. " - NCBI. BHT in Food is "Banned in England, and other European countries" - ABC News

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Fragrance Safety

(Also see Hydroquinone under Skin, Eye & Lung Irritant below)

Fragrance, Parfum

SCA does endorse products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that restrict the total usage of synthetic fragrance to 1% or less in leave-on products and 3% or less in wash-off products.
CAS No: 879-67-4; 52844-21-0; 2257-09-2; 6379-73-3; 67801-43-8; 7779-72-8
CAS No: 6502-23-4, 7774-82-5, 142-83-6, 52844-21-0, 3613-30-7, 7775-00-0, 65405-84-7, 33885-51-7, 93981-63-6, 605-85-6, 1333-52-4, 68459-99-4, 10316-66-2, 7549-37-3, 40910-49-4, 6379-73-3, 68213-86-5, 2114-29-6, 101-85-9
CAS No: Confidential
SYNTHETIC MAN MADE FRAGRANCES; Synonym(s): AROMA, PARFUM, PARFUME OR PERFUME; INCLUDING TRADE SECRET AROMAS. Related content: Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-methyl-, acetate
HOW IS IT USED?

Fragrances are used in almost every product including 'fragrance free' products; masking agents are used. Synthetic man made fragrances are found in; colognes, perfumes, fragrance mists, eau de cologne. A fragrance/perfume is imparts and diffuses an aroma, a fragrant odor.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • Known human immune toxicant or allergen, Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety
  • NICNAS - IMAP - Tier III - Human Health; not restricted for use; Critical Health Effects "The critical health effects identified have not changed from the Tier II assessment [potential skin sensitisation and systemic long-term effects (genotoxicity and carcinogenicity)]." And, "Health Hazard Information Fragrance ingredients may pose a concern in relation to their potential skin sensitisation, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity hazards. Since the time of the Tier II assessment of these chemicals, no animal data have become available on skin sensitisation and carcinogenicity." - NICNAS October 2018
  • "This Tier II group assessment includes further refinement of the risk characterisation for these chemicals where possible, and outlines the most significant data gaps that would need to be addressed to further refine the risk assessment." - NICNAS Australia September 2015
  • The Dirty Dozen
WHAT IS FRAGRANCE?

  • "The word "fragrance" or "parfum" on the product label represents an undisclosed mixture of various scent chemicals and ingredients used as fragrance dispersants such as diethyl phthalate. Fragrance mixes have been associated with allergies, dermatitis, respiratory distress and potential effects on the reproductive system. Synonym(s): AROMA; PARFUM" - EWG

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Benzene

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain benzene.
CAS No: 71-43-2, CAS No: 98-23-7 &
CAS No: 9017-27-0
"Chemicals starting with benzene or phenyl, or containing synthetic man made fragrances.  Synonym(s): (6) ANNULENE; BENZEEN (DUTCH) ; BENZEN (POLISH) ; BENZENE (ACGIH:OSHA) ; BENZIN (OBS.) ; BENZINE (OBS.) ; BENZOL (OSHA) ; BENZOLE; BENZOLENE; BENZOLO (ITALIAN) ; BICARBURET OF HYDROGEN" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

Benzene is hidden in the term 'Fragrance or Perfum' on the ingredient label and used in almost every product from skin care to baby care, cleaning agents, laundry, makeup and more. Benzene is a component of man made fragrances; derived form coal tar, it is a known human carcinogen - it can cause cancer.
RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS BENZENE?

  • Benzene is a synthetic component commonly found in 'fragrances'. "Benzene is an important starting material for many perfume ingredients. One of the most important perfume ingredients derived from benzene is 2-phenlyethanol. Phenylethanol is a major component of rose oils and is widely used in perfumery for its blending qualities." - CHM.

  • Benzene is used as an adhesive, solvent and thinner component. It is a synthetic man-made chemical used as a solvent in plastics; found in gasoline, jet fuel and dry cleaning products.

  • According to the the World Health Organization "Human exposure to benzene has been associated with a range of acute and long term adverse health effects and diseases, including cancer "
 
  • Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and other regulatory organisations around the world; "benzene is a known human carcinogen and endocrine disruptor."

  • NICNAS warns; “If a safer chemical or process can be substituted for one which involves benzene, then this should be done; Avoid skin contact by wearing benzene-resistant gloves and other personal protective equipment.”

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Xylene

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain xylene AKA synthetic musk.
CAS No: 68650-36-2
XYLENE or ortho-lean.; and "Synonym(s): BENZENE, DIMETHYL; BENZENE, DIMETHYL-; DIMETHYL- BENZENE; DIMETHYLBENZENE; META-XYLENE; TOTAL XYLENE; TOTAL XYLENES; XYLENE (MIXED) ; XYLENES; XYLENES (TOTAL) ; BENZENE, DIMETHYL-. Fragrance Ingredient; Solvent; MASKING; PERFUMING" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

Xylene is hidden in the term, 'Fragrance or Perfum' on the ingredient label and used in almost every product from deodorants to skincare, bath and body, baby care, oral care and more.

RESEARCH - WHAT EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS XYLENE?

  • Xylene is a synthetic musk fragrance that mimics natural musk, but is man made with synthetic chemicals. It is not natural. “The average fragrance product tested contained 14 secret chemicals not listed on the label,” reports EWG.

 "Avoiding the dangers of synthetic scents is crucial. It’s something I need you to share with your family and friends. When a company puts “fragrance” on the label, don’t be tricked. This is a catch-all term actually can stand for thousands of different ingredients (literally, at least 3,000). And when you use a product containing “fragrance” or “parfum,” all of those mysterious ingredients are absorbed right into your bloodstream. These ingredients are predominantly made from chemicals and are just outright toxic for your health in so many ways."
 
  • Fragrances are found in most cosmetic products including makeup, skincare creams, lotions and serums, hair care, shampoo and conditioners, scented candles and air fresheners, personal care like deodorant, soap and sunscreen, and of course perfumes, colognes and body sprays.

  • The most vulnerable are pregnant women, infants and children.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

  • "Classified as toxic or harmful (only for products for use on skin; products that may be aerosolized (airborne))" - EWG EuropeanUnion
 
Linked to cancer and neurotoxicity. “Many fragrances are toxic. Some of these fragrances may be phthalates, which can act as obesogens (cause obesity) and may otherwise disrupt normal endocrine function, including reproductive health. Phthalates may cause developmental defects and delays.” – Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D. Chemistry Expert.
 

"Toxic Trio" - Nail Polish

Dibutyl phthalate DBP

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain DBP.
CAS No: 84-74-2

"Synonym(s): 1,2-BENZENEDICARBOXYLIC ACID, DIBUTYL ESTER; BUTYL PHTHALATE; DBP; DI-N-BUTYLPHTHALATE; DIBUTYL 1,2-BENZENEDICARBOXYLATE; DIBUTYL ESTER 1,2-BENZENEDICARBOXYLIC ACID; DIBUTYL PHTHALATE; DIBUTYL PHTHALATE; DIBUTYL PHTHALATES; BENZENE-O-DICARBOXYLIC ACID DI-N-BUTYL ESTER; CELLUFLEX DPB; DBP (ESTER)" - EWG

HOW IS IT USED?


In Australia it is used in auto transmission lubricants, it is not restricted for use and is permitted in cosmetics. A third phthalate, Di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) is found in eyelash glue, and is widely used in nail polish and other consumer products.

RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS DBP?

  • Linked to early onset of puberty. NICNAS lists DPB as a Priority Existing Chemical.; based on a study involving just 15 people, NICNAS has not restricted this chemical for use claiming that there is limited evidence reporting skin irritation or toxicity. Australian products can contain up to 25% Phthalates.

  • "Dangers of Phthalates and DEHP. Phthalates, a family of industrial chemicals used to soften PVC plastic and as solvents in cosmetics and other consumer products, can damage the liver, kidneys, lungs, and reproductive system — particularly the developing testes — according to animal studies." - Health Care Without Harm US & Canada.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Touline

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain touline.
CAS No: 108-88-3
An aromatic compound, possibly contaminated with benzene. "Synonym(s): BENZENE, METHYL; BENZENE, METHYL-; METHYL- BENZENE; METHYLBENZENE; TOLUOL; ANTISAL 1A; BENZENE, METHYL-; CP 25; METHACIDE; METHANE, PHENYL-; METHYLBENZENE" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

Also identified on labels as Methylbenzene; Toluol and phenylmethane. Used in nail polish to dissolve resins and plasticiers.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • NICNAS - Australia; other names: Benzene Methyl-, Methylbenzene; TOLUENE; Toluol. Not restricted for use. Human Health Tier II assessment - no record of assessment found.
WHAT IS TOULINE?

  • "Toluene is used in making paints, paint thinners, fingernail polish, lacquers, adhesives, and rubber and in some printing and leather tanning processes. It is used in the production of benzene, nylon, plastics, and polyurethane and the synthesis of trinitrotoluene (TNT), benzoic acid, benzoyl chloride, and toluene diisocyanate. It is also added to gasoline along with benzene and xylene to improve octane ratings." - ATSDR.

  • ScienceDirect "Although similar to the neurobehavioral changes of benzene-induced toxic effects, those of toluene toxicity are more severe. Acute exposure causes fatigue, mild confusion, ataxia, and dizziness. Chronic use is associated with euphoria, disinhibition, and tremor. Neurobehavioral effects include decreases in performance IQ, memory abnormalities, poor motor control, decreased visuospatial functioning, and dementia.15 Treatment consists of removal from the source of toluene exposure."

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Formaldehyde

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain formalin.
CAS No: 50-00-0

"Synonym(s): FORMALIN; FORMIC ALDEHYDE; MERTHALDEHYDE; METHANAL; METHYL ALDEHYDE; OXOMETHANE; OXYMETHYLENE; ALDEHYD MRAVENCI (CZECH) ; ALDEHYDE FORMIQUE (FRENCH) ; ALDEIDE FORMICA (ITALIAN) ; BFV" - EWG

HOW IS IT USED?

Formalin is commonly found in nail hardeners, keratin hair straighteners, shampoo and baby wash including soaps and liquid baby wash.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • Banned in cosmetics in Japan and Sweden.
  • Banned in the United States
  • Restricted in Canada.
  • NICNAS Australia - Human Health Tier II assessment November 2006, not restricted for use.
WHAT IS FORMALDEHYDE?

  • Naturally occurring and commonly used in the form of formalin, it inhibits the growth of microorganisms. Other names: Formic aldehyde; Methaldehyde; Methanal; Oxomethane; Oxymethylene.

  • Multiple health concerns, mainly skin irritation. Commonly used in colour cosmetics and liquid hair and baby care products, hand sanitisers, paint and carpets, nail products and all kinds of household cleaning agents.
  • Approximately 20% of cosmetics and personal care products, contain a formaldehyde releasing preservatives. In 1996, the production of formaldehyde was estimated at 8.7 million tons per year.

  • Toxicity Category I for eye irritation and Toxicity Category II for skin irritation.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Petroleum Derivatives

Isoparaffin

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that contain less than 1% Isoparaffin in leave-on products and 2.5% in wash-off products.

Where a brand tests their products and/or the ingredient of concern is tested for carcinogenic contaminants, test reports confirming that the product and/or ingredients are free-from carcinogens can be submitted; SCA will endorse the product(s) containing toxic-free mineral oil with unrestricted usage provided proof of testing is provided.
CAS No: 68551-20-2 ALKANES
C13-C16 Isoparaffin

"C13-14 Isoparaffin, Isododecane and Isohexadecane.; C7-8 Isoparaffin, C8-9 Isoparaffin, C9-11 Isoparaffin, C9-12 Isoparaffin, C9-13 Isoparaffin, C9-14 Isoparaffin, C9-16 Isoparaffin, C10-11 Isoparaffin, C10-12 Isoparaffin, C10-13 Isoparaffin, C11-12 Isoparaffin, C11-13 Isoparaffin, C11-14 Isoparaffin, C12-14 Isoparaffin, C12-20 Isoparaffin, C13-16 Isoparaffin, C18-70 Isoparaffin, C20-40 Isoparaffin, Isooctane and Isoeicosane." - COSMETICS INFO

HOW IS IT USED?

Isoparaffin is a petroleum derivative found in eye make-up products including mascara, creams and lotions, nail manicure products, skin, hair and baby products. Petroleum derivatives; AKA Petroleum jelly as it is commonly known, forms a barrier on the skin According to Dr Dattner, "Petroleum jelly can create the illusion of moisturized, hydrated skin, all the while suffocating your pores." Issues concern contamination, petroleum derivatives are loaded with carcinogens that are then purified by processing to remove 1,4-dioxane a known cancer causing agent.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS ISOPARAFFIN?

  • Natural & Organic brands avoid petroleum derivatives due to the fact that they block the skin's ability to breathe. "The skin’s ability to release toxins is impeded by this ‘plastic wrap,’ that can promote acne and other disorders. This process slows down skin function and normal cell development causing the skin to prematurely age." - Charis Naturals.

  • Derived from petroleum and considered safe provided the potential presence of carcinogen 1,4-dioxane is removed; "controlled through purification steps to remove it before blending C13-14 isoparaffin into cosmetic formulations." - The Derm Review. "Some scientists believe that 1,4-dioxane may cause cancer by a nongenotoxic mechanism." - ATSDR
  • "1,4-dioxane has also been linked with skin allergies and is a kidney toxin, neurotoxin, and a respiratory toxin." - The Derm Review.
  • The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel states that they have "reviewed relevant animal and clinical data and concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment."
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Mineral Oil

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that contain less than 1% Mineral Oil in leave-on products and 2.5% in wash-off products.

Where a brand tests their products and/or the ingredient of concern is tested for carcinogenic contaminants, test reports confirming that the product and/or ingredients are free-from carcinogens can be submitted; SCA will endorse the product(s) containing toxic-free mineral oil with unrestricted usage provided proof of testing is provided.
CAS No: 92062-35-6, CAS No: 8042-47-5, CAS No: 68918-04-7
Mineral oil can contain Polyacrylamide and acrylamide copolymers. Other names; white spirits, Mineral oil, disulfonic acids, disodium salts.. "Synonym(s): DEOBASE; HEAVY MINERAL OIL; LIGHT MINERAL OIL; LIQUID PARAFFIN; LIQUID PETROLATUM; PARAFFIN OIL; PARAFFIN OILS; PARAFFINUM LIQUIDUM; PETROLEUM WHITE MINERAL OIL; PROLATUM OIL; WHITE MINERAL OIL, PETROLEUM" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

Mineral oils are derived petroleum. It blocks the skin, disrupting the skin's natural barrier and inhibiting it's ability to breathe. "Derived from carcinogenic-laden crude oil, a non-renewable resource that contributes to environmental damage." - Eco Store

Found in common personal care products including eye shadow, moisturiser, lip gloss, lipstick, conditioner, hair color & bleaching agents, facial treatments, styling gel/lotions, blush and concealer products. Petrolatum derivatives are used in products that target the eyes and skin though direct contact. And, "explosives, domestic use in adhesives, commercial use in lubricants and additives; and candles, lubricants, antistatic products"; And, "The total volume introduced into Australia, reported under previous mandatory and/or voluntary calls for information, for microcrystalline paraffin and hydrocarbon waxes (CAS No. 63231-60-7) and petrolatum (CAS No. 8009-03-8) was <1000 tonnes." NICNAS
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS MINERAL OIL?

  • The issue is that there are varying grades of petroleum derivatives and not all manufacturers adhere to high standards in removing carcinogenic impurities. There are currently no restrictions on importing petroleum derivatives into Australia and no mandatory testing guidelines. The term 'mineral oil' can refer to highly refined oils found in baby products or untreated less processed mineral oils that are used in engine oils, transmission fluids and gear oils lubricants.

  • Your skin is the largest vital organ that is required to work with your kidneys and liver to remove toxins from your body - anything that interferes with this vital system has a negative impact on your health. Studies conclude that because petroleum derivatives are barely
    absorbed by the skin, the application of cosmetic products containing mineral oils do not pose issues with systemic exposure.
  • Mineral oil is used in many products such as makeup, lipsticks, foundation, sorboline, baby oil, bath and body oils, body wash, sunscreen and medicinal creams to treat eczema.
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Petrolatum

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that contain less than 1% Petrolatum in leave-on products and 2.5% in wash-off products.

Where a brand tests their products and/or the ingredient of concern is tested for carcinogenic contaminants, test reports confirming that the product and/or ingredients are free-from carcinogens can be submitted; SCA will endorse the product(s) containing toxic-free petrolatum with unrestricted usage provided proof of testing is provided.
CAS No: 8009-03-8, 63231-60-7, 64742-26-3, 64742-33-2, 64742-42-3, 64742-43-4, 64742-51-4, 64742-60-5, 64742-61-6, 64743-01-7, 92062-09-4, and 97489-05-9
Also known as petroleum jelly, red or white petrolatum; and "Synonym(s): MINERAL GREASE (PETROLATUM) ; MINERAL JELLY; PETROLATUM AMBER; PETROLATUM WHITE; PETROLEUM JELLY; YELLOW PETROLATUM" - EWG
 
"Petrolatum, or petroleum jelly, derived from petroleum, is often used in personal care products as a moisturizing agent. When properly refined, petrolatum has no known health concerns. However, petrolatum is often not fully refined in the US, which means it can be contaminated with toxic chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)." - Campaign For Safe Cosmetics USA

"When properly refined, petrolatum has no known health concerns. However, petrolatum is often not fully refined in the US, which means it can be contaminated with toxic chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These qualities make petrolatum a popular ingredient in skincare products and cosmetics." - SafeCosmetics.org
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • NICNAS Human Health Tier II assessment November 2014; Hydrocarbon, paraffin and slack waxes. No restrictions on use.
  • Restricted in the US; With the exception of petrolatum (CAS No. 8009-03-8), microcrystalline wax (CAS No. 63231-60-7) and hydrogenated microcrystalline wax (CAS No. 64742-60-5), there is currently no documented use of these chemicals in cosmetic products in the United States of America (USA).
  • International; The chemicals with CAS Nos 8009-03-8 and 64742-61-6, 64743-01-7 and 92062-09-4 are listed on the following, except if the full refining history is known, and it can be shown that the substance from which it is produced is not a carcinogen (Galleria Chemica):
  • EU Cosmetics Regulation 1223/2009 Annex II—List of substances prohibited in cosmetic products; and
  • New Zealand Cosmetic Products Group Standard—Schedule 4: Components cosmetic products must not contain;
  • Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) Cosmetic Directive Annex II Part 1: List of substances which must not form part of the composition of cosmetic products." - NICNAS
  • The Dirty Dozen
WHAT IS PETROLATUM?
Derived from petroleum; it is known to contain CARCINOGENS; it must be processed to remove these cancer causing impurities.
"The problem is that variations in processing, and the lack of regulation in testing petroleum derivatives varies greatly. SCA campaigns for mandatory testing of petroleum derivatives to confirm that carcinogens have been removed before being permitted for use in cosmetics including lipsticks, balms, baby skin care, ointments and many other products." - Amina Kitching, Founder of SCA.  "No data are available for the chemicals." - NICNAS Australian Government Department of Health, National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme.
 

Parabens & Sunscreen

(See TEA below under Skin, Eye & Lung Irritant)

Parabens

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain propyl or butyl parabens.
PROPYLPARABEN CAS No: 94-13-3
BUTYLPARABEN CAS No: 94-26-8
HOW IS IT USED?
Parabens are a synthetic preservative system for an array of cosmetics and personal care products: known to cause skin irritation and sensitivities when applied to broken skin.
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • Parabens and breast cancer; "A new study has found that chemicals called parabens can spur the growth of certain types of breast cancer cells" - WebMD.
  • "Parabens are chemicals that have been shown to have estrogen-like properties, and estrogen is one of the hormones involved in the development of breast cancer." - Dr Mercola.
WHAT ARE PARABENS?
  • Parabens get a bad name because they are synthetic. In an article for Allergic Living, Dr Sandy Skotnicki, Dermatologist, advises that parabens are safe to use on normal healthy skin. "The one area where parabens can cause problems is with inflamed skin. This is known as the “Paraben Paradox”. And, "In essence, parabens almost never cause a problem on normal skin, but can cause allergic dermatitis when used on active skin disease, such as wounds or eczema. This is why parabens are never used to preserve topical hydrocortisone creams or antibiotic ointments." - Allergic Living.

  • Parabens prevent bacteria from growing in products like moisturisers that repeatedly come into contact with germs from your hands as you apply it to your face. "The American Chemical Society estimates that parabens are in about 85% of personal care products -- everything from shampoo to shaving cream. Researchers believe most of us get our greatest exposure from these products as they’re absorbed through the skin." - Brenda Goodman, MA

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Benzophenone

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain benzophenone.
CAS No: 1341-54-4
SUNSCREEN "Benzophenone 11; and Synonym(s): A-OXODIPHENYLMETHANE; A-OXODITANE; BENZENE, BENZOYL-; BENZOYL- BENZENE; BENZOYLBENZENE; DIPHENYL KETONE; DIPHENYL- METHANONE; DIPHENYLMETHANONE; METHANONE, DIPHENYL; METHANONE, DIPHENYL-; PHENYL KETONE" - EWG 
HOW IS IT USED?
Sunscreen chemical; functions as sunscreen agent absorbing ultraviolet light.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • NICNAS No usage restrictions apply.
  • The European Food Safety Authority EFSA classifies benzophenone as a known toxicant because it can cause liver hypertrophy in rats at low doses. "Found in: Lip balm, nail polish, foundations, baby sunscreens, fragrance, shampoo, conditioner, hair spray, moisturizers, and foundation"
WHAT IS BENZOPHENONE?

  • The European Food Safety Authority EFSA classifies benzophenone as a known toxicant because it can cause liver hypertrophy in rats at low doses. "Found in: Lip balm, nail polish, foundations, baby sunscreens, fragrance, shampoo, conditioner, hair spray, moisturizers, and foundation"

  • "Many chemical sunscreens have been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer. Among the most hazardous are those containing oxybenzone, synthetic fragrances and retinyl palmitate (vitamin A)" - Dr Mercola
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Oxybenzone

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain oxybenzone.

CAS No: 131-57-7

SUNSCREEN "Oxybenzone; Synonym(s): BENZOPHENONE-3, (2-HYDROXY-4-METHOXYPHENYL) PHENYL- METHANONE; (2-HYDROXY-4-METHOXYPHENYL) PHENYLMETHANONE; 2-BENZOYL-5-METHOXYPHENOL; 2-HYDROXY-4-METHOXYBENZOPHENONE; 4-08-00-02442 (BEILSTEIN HANDBOOK REFERENCE) ; 4-METHOXY-2-HYDROXYBENZOPHENONE; ADVASTAB 45; AI3-23644; ANUVEX; B3; BENZOPHENONE, 2-HYDROXY-4-METHOXY-" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?
Sunscreen chemical; functions as sunscreen agents absorbing ultraviolet light. Oxybenzone is also used in nail polish, fragrances, hair spray, and other skin care and cosmetics. Wikipedia says it is also in concentrations up to 1%, in nail polishes. And, Humans can absorb anywhere from 0.4% to 8.7% of oxybenzone after one topical application of sunscreen, as measured in urine excretions.
RESEARCH - WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
  • NICNAS No usage restrictions apply.
WHAT IS OXYBENZONE?
  • Oxybenzone, or benzonephenone-3, is one of the most common sunscreen chemical filters. It forms colorless crystals that are readily soluble and provides UV protection.

  • "Many chemical sunscreens have been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer. Among the most hazardous are those containing oxybenzone, synthetic fragrances and retinyl palmitate (vitamin A)" - Dr Mercola

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Skin, Eye & Lung Irritants

Carbon Black

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain carbon black.
CAS No: 1333-86-4
Carbon Black; and "Synonym(s): CHANNEL BLACK; PIGMENT BLACK 6; PIGMENT BLACK 7; ACETYLENE BLACK; AROFLOW; AROGEN; AROTONE; AROVEL; ARROW; ATLANTIC; BLACK PEARLS " -  EWG
HOW IS IT USED?
Carbon Black functions as a colourant; "composed of finely divided particles of elemental carbon obtained bythe incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons (channel or impingement process)." - EWG
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
WHAT IS CARBON BLACK?
  • NICNAS has No restrcitions on importing or use of this colourant that is banned in the US;
  • "Violation of government restrictions - Restricted in cosmetics; use, concentration, or manufacturing restrictions - Color additive not approved by FDA for cosmetics used around eyes (only for products for use around the eyes)" And, "Violation of government restrictions - Banned or found unsafe for use in cosmetics." CTFA International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook. And, "Possible human carcinogenCalifornia EPA Proposition 65" - EWG

  • Toxicity Assessment "Results from reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay indicated that carbon black waste extract induced oxidative stress by increasing intracellular ROS generation in these three human cell lines. Moreover, induction of oxidative damage in these cells was also observed through the alteration of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Last but not least, by treating the cells with V-spiked solution of concentration equivalent to that found in the carbon black waste extract, V was identified as the main culprit for the high toxicity of carbon black waste extract. These findings could potentially provide insight into the hazards of carbon black waste extract and its toxicity mechanism on human cell lines." - NCBI
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Hydroquinone

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain hydroquinone.
CAS No: 123-31-9
"1,4-dihydroxybenzene; and Synonym(s): 1,4-BENZENEDIOL; 1,4-DIHYDROXYBENZENE; 1,4BENZENEDIOL; 4-HYDROXYPHENOL; P-DIOXYBENZENE; P-HYDROXYPHENOL; 1,4-BENZENEDIOL; 1,4-DIHYDROXY-BENZEEN (DUTCH) ; 1,4-DIHYDROXY-BENZOL (GERMAN) ; 1,4-DIHYDROXYBENZEN (CZECH) ; 1,4-DIHYDROXYBENZENE-" - EWG
HOW IS IT USED?

Commonly found in: "Skin lighteners, facial and skin cleansers, facial moisturizers, hair conditioners, finger nail coating products." And, "Hydroquinone is used in cosmetics as an antioxidant, fragrance ingredient and oxidizing agent in hair dyes. Hydroquinone may also be used as a stabilizer that inhibits the polymerization of the adhesive in artificial nails." - CosmeticsInfo.org

RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • Banned from cosmetics in the European Union; Restricted use in Canadian cosmetics
Violation of government restrictions; Banned or found unsafe for use in cosmetics CosIng; Restricted in the US max 2% in personal care products only.

WHAT IS HYDROQUINONE?

  • "This material causes pigmentation of the eye and, in some cases, permanent corneal damage. There are reported cases of keratitis and discoloration of the conjunctiva among men exposed to concentrations ranging from 10 to 30 mg of vapor or dust of HQ per cubic meter of air. Ingestion of 1 g by an adult has caused dizziness, sense of suffocation, increased rate of respiration, vomiting, pallor, muscular twitching, headache, dyspnea, cyanosis and collapse and eventually death due to respiratory failure." - ToxNet

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

PPD

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain PPD.
CAS No: 106-50-3
PPD phenylenediamin; and "Synonym(s): p-PHENYLENEDIAMINE, 1,4-BENZENEDIAMINE; 1,4-PHENYLENEDIAMINE; 1,4BENZENEDIAMINE; CI 76060; OXIDATION BASE 10; P-AMINOANILINE; P-DIAMINOBENZENE; 1,4-BENZENEDIAMINE (9CI) ; 1,4-DIAMINOBENZENE; 1,4-PHENYLENEDIAMINE; 4-AMINOANILINE" EWG
HOW IS IT USED?
"Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is found in most permanent hair dyes. Those who are allergic will likely develop a rash not on the scalp but around the hairline on the forehead and neck and behind the ears. According to Gross, allergy to PPD seems to increase with age. Avoid contact by requesting PPD-free dyes or opting for henna and color rinses that don't contain the irritant." - MarieClaire
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
European Union permitts PPD only for products for use on skin. NICNAS issued a warning June 2014 contamination by phenylenediamine and heavey metals.
WHAT IS PPD?
  • Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is a chemical substance that is widely used in permanent hair dyes.

  • "PPD is also present in many inks used for temporary tattoos. The FDA stated, “So-called “black henna” may contain the “coal tar” color p-phenylenediamine, also known as PPD. This ingredient may cause allergic reactions in some individuals. The only legal use of PPD in cosmetics is as a hair dye." And, "PPD is potentially capable of causing multiple toxic effects following skin contact." And, "PPD has potent skin-sensitizing properties." And, "Studies have also identified the chemical as the third most common ingredient, after fragrances and preservatives, that can cause contact dermatitis from cosmetics"- AnnMarie
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Toxic chemicals in cleaning products

Cleaning products do Not have to include the product ingredients like cosmetics are required to provide on each and every product.

Quats

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain QUATs.
CAS No: 61789-75-1 ; Other names: Benzyldimethyl tallow quaternary ammonium chloride.
CAS No: 71011-25-1 ; Other names: Dimethyl dihydrogenated tallow ammonium chloride, reaction products with dimethylbenzyl hydrogenated tallow ammonium chloride and bentonite.
CAS No: 61789-74-0
SURFACTANTS; CAS No: 8001-54-5, 85665-42-5, 63449-41-2, 68989-00-4, 91080-30-7, 85409-22-9, 68424-85-1, 68391-01-5, 68607-20-5, 91080-31-8, 61789-75-1, 61789-72-8, 61789-71-7, 61789-74-0,
CAS No: 112-00-5, 1119-94-4, 4574-04-3, 1119-97-7, 112-02-7, 57-09-0, 505-86-2, 124-03-8, 112-03-8, 17301-53-0, 5538-94-3, 7173-51-5, 2390-68-3, 10361-16-7, 3401-74-9, 1812-53-9, 107-64-2, 123312-54-9, 85409-24-1, 68391-03-7, 106233-03-8, 68607-24-9, 8030-78
Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C12-16), Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (C14 60%, C16 30%, C12 5%, C18 5%), Alkyl dimethyl ethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (C12-14), Alkyl dimethyl ethylbenzyl ammonium chlorides (C12-18), Benzalkonium chloride, Benzethonium chloride, Cetalkonium chloride, Cetrimonium chloride, Chemical DTDMAC (ditallow dimethyl ammonium chloride), Didecyldimethylammonium chloride, Dioctyldimethylammonium chloride, Diethyl ester dimethyl ammonium chloride, Dialkyl dimethl ammonium methyl sulfate, Lauryl dimonium, hydrolysed collagen, Stearalkonium chloride, Hydroxethyl methyl ammonium methyl sulfate; also called quaternium-18, Quaternium-18, Quaternium-26 and other numbers.
HOW IS THIS USED?
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds;
found in fabric softener liquids, disinfectant wipes and sprays, as well as most household cleaners labeled “antibacterial or disinfectant”
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • IMAP - Tier II - Environment.
  • NICNAS No restrictions for use.
WHAT ARE QUATs?
  • "This ingredient and related ingredients are all called quats—”quaterny ammonium compounds” that are used in a wide range of products as preservatives, surfactants, and germicides. Some are also used as conditioning agents, giving skin and hair a slippery and smooth feel." - AnneMarieSkincare

  • Disinfectant products; "effective against most vegetative bacteria and enveloped viruses, and some fungi." - Science Direct

  • "In addition to harming germs, quats are lung irritants and can contribute to asthma and other breathing problems. They irritate skin too – and can lead to rashes. (This is one reason why packages of antibacterial wipes strongly recommend washing your hands after use.  A factor that really takes the convenience out of using a wipe in the first place!)" - www.womensvoices.org
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Ammonia

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain ammonia or peroxide (see above).

CAS No: 7664-41-7 & CAS No: 7664-41-7
Ammonia and Ammonium hydroxideand; Ammonia anhydrous; Ammonia gas; and Ammoniac "Synonym(s): AMMONIA (NH3-N) ; AMMONIA NITROGEN UNIONIZED (AS N) ; AMMONIA, ANHYDROUS; AMMONIA, UNIONIZED; NH3-N; UNIONIZED AMMONIA; UNIONIZED AMMONIA AS N; AM-FOL; AMMONIA (ACGIH:OSHA) ; AMMONIA ANHYDROUS; AMMONIA GAS" - EWG
HOW IS THIS USED?
Ammonia is a cleaning solution commonly used in household and industrial cleaning products; toilet and bathroom cleaners and polishing agents for bathroom fixtures, sinks and jewelry. It is also used in water purifucation, rubber, paper, pharmaceuticals and explosives.
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY
  • NICNAS Human Health Tier II
WHAT IS AMMONIA?


  • “Ammonia is a powerful irritant,” says Donna Kasuska, chemical engineer and president of ChemConscious, Inc., a risk-management consulting company. “It’s going to affect you right away. The people who will be really affected are those who have asthma, and elderly people with lung issues and breathing problems. It’s almost always inhaled. People who get a lot of ammonia exposure, like housekeepers, will often develop chronic bronchitis and asthma.” Ammonia can also create a poisonous gas if it’s mixed with bleach." - 8 Hidden toxins by ExperiencedLife.com

  • "Ingredients with high acute toxicity include chlorine bleach and ammonia, which produce fumes that are highly irritating to eyes, nose, throat and lungs, and should not be used by people with asthma or lung or heart problems. These two chemicals pose an added threat in that they can react with each other or other chemicals to form lung-damaging gases. Combining products that contain chlorine and ammonia or ammonia and lye (in some oven cleaners) produces chloramine gases, while chlorine combined with acids (commonly used in toilet bowl cleaners) forms toxic chlorine gas." - OrganicConsumers.org, How toxic are your household cleaning supplies?
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

Butoxyethanol

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain butoxyethanol.
Domestic/Cleaning; CAS No: 111-76-2
2-Butoxyethanol; and "Synonym(s): 2-BUTOXY- ETHANOL; 2-BUTOXYETHANOL; BUTYL GLYCOL; ETHANOL, 2-BUTOXY-; ETHANOL, 2BUTOXY; ETHYLENE GLYCOL MONOBUTYL ETHER; GLYCOL MONOBUTYL ETHER; MONOBUTYL ETHYLENE GLYCOL ETHER; 2-BUTOSSI-ETANOLO (ITALIAN) ; 2-BUTOXY-1-ETHANOL; 2-BUTOXY-AETHANOL (GERMAN)." - EWG
HOW IS THIS USED?
Domestic/Cleaning Products (not cosmetics); Found in window and glass cleaners, multi-purpose sprays; butoxyethanol is a common solvent used to remove dirt with less effort. 
RESEARCH - WHAT DO EXPERTS SAY
  • Use: Domestic/Cleaning
  • PEC - Priority Existing Chemical
  • "A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency review finds inhalation of 2-butoxyethanol causes liver damage in lab animals. And,
  • Harmful in contact with skin; GHS Hazard Codes - EU GHS Hazard Labeling Codes; Harmful if inhaled." - EWG
WHAT IS BUTOXYETHANOL?
  • "2-Butoxyethanol is readily absorbed following inhalation, oral, and dermal exposure. ... 2-Butoxyethanol has moderate acute toxicity and is irritating to the eyes and skin; it is not a skin sensitizer." - World Health Organisation

  • "Harmful effects on the liver and kidney were seen in some animals and may be related to hemolysis. 2-Butoxyethanol is also irritating to the skin and eyes of animals, as it is in people. ... Other reproductive effects and birth defects in animals have only been observed at doses that were toxic to the adult animals." - Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry

  • "2-Butoxyethanol is readily absorbed via all routes of exposure (inhalation, dermal, ingestion) with low to moderate acute toxicity via oral, dermal and inhalation routes." And, 2-Butoxyethanol at 20% is too high for general consumer use in domestic products given its potential for skin and eye irritation and inhalation toxicity ." And, "Risks; The most sensitive toxicological end point is the destruction of red blood cells (haemolysis). Additional toxicities include neurotoxicity (loss of coordination, sluggishness and narcosis) and nephrotoxicity. And, 2-butoxyethanol has low to moderate acute toxicity via oral, dermal and inhalation routes, and severe skin and eye irritancy." - TGA Therapeutic Goods Administration Australia
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:
 

Personal Hygiene

- Content is being updated -

Chlorine

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain chlorine.
CAS No: 7782-50-5

Synonym(s): molecular chlorine; bertholite; chloor; chlorinating. Elemental chlorine gas.

HOW IS IT USED?
Chlorine kills bacteria, it is a common disinfectant. It is used as the bleaching agent in the production of tampons, sanitary pads, toilet paper and baby's nappies. This process can cause dioxins to be detected in trace amounts. It is used to treat drinking water and swimming pool water. It is also used to make other chemical products including dishwashing detergents, chlorine bleach, chlorinated disinfectant cleaners, mildew removers and toilet cleaners as well as paper, paints, textiles, insecticides; it can be found in perfumes and deodorants. Approx. 20% of chlorine produced is used to make PVC. 
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY:
WHAT IS CHLORINE?
  • In an article for Goop, Dr Maggie Ney says that  "most cotton tampons—at least 85%, certainly any cotton that is not organic—contain glyphosate, which is problematic because it is a known cancer-causing agent. In fact, the World Health Organization recently ruled it as “probably carcinogenic.” The vagina is a highly permeable space: Anything we put inside can easily be absorbed through the mucus membrane and then into our bloodstream where it presents a toxic burden to the body. Chronic exposure increases our risk of cancer, causes oxidative stress and metabolic changes, and disrupts our endocrine system. This can contribute to adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immunological effects. Conditions such as infertility, endometriosis, and thyroid disorders are all on the rise, for example, and are affected by exposures to chemicals and toxins in our environment." - Goop.com
  • "Activists are calling for more scrutiny of the manufacturing process of a consumer product used by a woman for about a week out of every month of her childbearing years." And, "The Food and Drug Administration regulates menstrual hygiene products as medical devices, a category that also includes dental floss and condoms. The agency recommends manufacturers provide general information on the label about the material composition of the product – such as whether the product is made of cotton or rayon — but does not require the individual ingredients, said Deborah Kotz, an F.D.A. spokeswoman." - New York Times.
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTCILES:

Dioxins

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain dioxins.
CAS No: 18096-62-3
Synonym(s): DIOXIN; 2,3,7,8-TCDD; DIOKSYNY (POLISH) ; DIOXIN; DIOXIN (HERBICIDE CONTAMINANT) ; DIOXINE; NCI-C03714; TCDBD; TCDD; TETRADIOXIN
HOW ARE THEY USED?
Toxic chemicals found in womens menstrual pad and tampons can include: aluminum, alcohols, odour blcokers like aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex and synthetic man made fragrance. Dioxins are a group of chemicals that are persistent environmental pollutants (POPs). "Some 419 types of dioxin-related compounds have been identified but only about 30 of these are considered to have significant toxicity, with TCDD being the most toxic." - World Health Organisation
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY?
WHAT ARE DIOXINS?
  • "Toxic ingredients found in tampons today include aluminum, alcohols, fragrance additives and hydrocarbons. Worst of all, tampon bleaching processes leave behind dioxin." - Canadian Women's Health Network

  • "Dioxins are a group of chemically-related compounds that are persistent environmental pollutants (POPs). Dioxins are found throughout the world in the environment and they accumulate in the food chain, mainly in the fatty tissue of animals." - World Health Organisation
RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES:

aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex

SCA endorses products with the Toxic-Free Tick, that do not contain aluminum zirconium.
CAS No: 98106-52-6
Other names; aluminium zirconium tetrachlorohydrate; tetraaluminium zirconium tetrachloride dodecahydroxide
HOW IS  IT USED?
Aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex is an odour blocker. It masks foul smells in personal hygiene products including deodorants, antiperspirants, baby nappies, womens pads and tampons. Synthetic fragrances are also used, they can contain multiple toxic chemicals including xylene, bronopol and thousands of other unknown chemicals.
RESEARCH - WHAT DO THE EXPERTS SAY?
WHAT ARE ODOUR BLOCKERS?
  • Aluminum zirconium tetrachlorohydrex acts an an odour blocker. The aluminum and zirconium prevents the body's glands from producing sweat, without moisture from sweat being present this minimises bacteria that causes foul odours.

  • "Deodorant doesn’t prevent sweating. It is the smell blocker that tries to target the fats and proteins that have become bacteria. Antiperspirants prevent sweating.
When there is no sweat, there is no bacteria, which means there is no smell. The aluminum and zirconium in this product plug up the sweat glands. There are many rumors that antiperspirants prevent the body from naturally releasing toxins and are linked to cancer but this has not been proven" The Coast News Group.

  • Odour blockers come with warnings: "For external use only. Do not use on broken skin

    Ask a doctor before use if you have kidney disease. Stop use if rash or irritation occurs. Keep out of reach of children. If swallowed, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center right away." - Daily Med.

RESOURCES & RECOMMENDED ARTICLES: